EARLY SIGNS OF SUCCESS IN THE COGNITIVE REHABILITATION OF CHILDREN LIVING WITH HIV/AIDS IN RURAL SOUTH AFRICA

ANJA, MULDER and SIZWE, ZONDO (2014) EARLY SIGNS OF SUCCESS IN THE COGNITIVE REHABILITATION OF CHILDREN LIVING WITH HIV/AIDS IN RURAL SOUTH AFRICA. In: Second International Conference on Advances In Social Science, Management and Human Behaviour - SMHB 2014, 25 - 26 October, 2014, Zurich, Switzerland.

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Abstract

Antiretroviral treatment is found to be lacking in its ability to aid improvements in HIV-associated neurocognitive deficits. Despite the fact that a significant portion of South Africa’s population is affected by HIV-infection, no known studies on the potential benefits of cognitive rehabilitation therapy exist for this context. This study used a quasi-experimental research design and sought to provide preliminary findings on the application of a cognitive intervention program (Attention Process Training (APT) to improve attention function in a sample of children living with HIV/AIDS. Three vertically infected HIV-positive children were assigned to eight APT intervention training sessions addressing selective attention. Selective attention measures were taken before and after intervention training, using two subtests of the Test for Everyday Attention in Children (TEA-Ch). Although repeated non-parametric analyses showed non-significant findings for the pre and post scores after the APT intervention (Z=1.15, p = 0.25 and Z = 0.0, p = 1.00) slight improvement in attention scores was noted. Future recommendations include the need for a control group, a larger sample size, and running the intervention over a longer period of time.

Item Type: Conference or Workshop Item (Paper)
Uncontrolled Keywords: HIV, cognitive rehabilitation, TEACh, APT, selective attention.1
Depositing User: Mr. John Steve
Date Deposited: 29 May 2019 07:58
Last Modified: 29 May 2019 07:58
URI: http://publications.theired.org/id/eprint/2951

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